Posted in Miscellaneous

Jumping in with Two Feet

{Image from: https://www.barepockets.com/spectacular-cliff-diving-spots/}

It has been awhile since I last posted, but for a good reason… I accepted an intern position in Jordan School District and started teaching second grade in July! It has been quite the adventure! As I have reflected on the beginning of my time as an intern, the phrase “jumping in with two feet” has come to mind. I think we’re pretty familiar with this idiom, but I looked up the meaning and found the following: Jumping in with two feet means “to begin or undertake something quickly, enthusiastically, and without trepidation”. In my case, I definitely had to take on a second grade class quickly… I finished my TELL student teaching experience at the end of June and the first day of school was on July 26th! I had to be enthusiastic… which wasn’t hard because teaching is a dream come true for me and second graders are still excited about school!  Finally, I can’t say that I wasn’t nervous, but I heard once that, “being nervous shows you care about the outcome”. So, I think being a little bit nervous is good! 

Throughout my years taking classes in the McKay building, I always heard the options of student teaching, interning, and student teaching abroad. I always leaned towards interning. It worked out for me time-wise and by the end of my practicum experiences, I felt ready to have my own classroom and implement my own classroom management plan. I was ready to “jump in with two feet”!

As it turns out, I really was ready! Professors, Clinical Faculty Associates (CFAs), and academic advisors are honest about the rigors of the internship option. It is, indeed, difficult. I am a few months in and I can definitely say that it is hard, but it’s also really fun! I have loved the chance to set up my own classroom and decide what procedures to implement. There were some procedures that I didn’t implement week 1 because I didn’t even know I needed them! I think that’s part of “jumping in with two feet”! There is a steep learning curve, but this experience has been so rewarding!

Since I was hired to teach at a year-round school, I started on July 26th, instead of mid-August, I had to try to wrap my head around a curriculum that I wasn’t familiar with and a class full of students I hadn’t met yet… all in about one month. Somehow I did it! It has been stressful to make things up as I go, but when those things go well, it’s so rewarding! I have a facilitator, or a mentor teacher, that has been by my side every step of the way. A big part of her job everyday is helping me! When I have questions about a student with an IEP (Individualized Education Plan) or how to teach art next week, she is right there to help and give me advice.  The grade level team that I am a part of is so supportive, and so is my principal.

If you’re wondering whether or not to pursue a degree in teaching, or whether or not to intern, I would say… Go for it! Jump in with two feet… it’s so worth it!

Advertisements
Posted in Miscellaneous

The Power of Reflection

reflection-mulan

I recently completed my K-2 practicum experience. A practicum is a four-week field experience in an elementary school in one of BYU’s partnership districts.  You have the opportunity to be paired with a mentor teacher, who allows you to come into her classroom, observe, and teach! I had a very positive experience and learned so much!

Throughout the practicum, student teachers are expected to keep a daily reflection journal, which, for convenience, exists on a GoogleDoc. After practicum, we write several reflection papers about lessons we taught and the experience as a whole. Some might see all of these papers and reflections as excessive, but today I learned otherwise. I was sitting in one of my classes where a guest lecturer was speaking; she has been a kindergarten teacher for many years. She shared a sketchbook with us that she uses as her “reflection journal”. What I loved most about our visitor’s reflection sketchbook idea was that she could doodle, write, or even include pictures. She even stapled in things she wanted to save or remember. She made the recommendation to take lots of pictures. This sketchbook is her place to reflect on the lessons she teaches: what worked, what didn’t work, and ideas she has for next time. She said, “You have to reflect. It helps you become better”. She said “Right after you teach, write about it!”. I can attest to that. Immediately after I taught a lesson during my practicum experience, my mind was full of my perceived failures and successes in that particular lesson. It’s a good idea to get those ideas on paper when they are fresh in your mind. I was able to go back and read my reflection journal several times and improve my management and teaching strategies.

How do you reflect on your teaching in order to become a better educator? If a sketchbook doesn’t work for you, what does? How has reflecting on your teaching helped you become a better teacher?

 

Posted in Miscellaneous

Practicum Pep Talk

Have you ever found a talk, article, or devotional that you just couldn’t keep to yourself; you had to share it with everyone? That happened to me this week. It was a TED talk by Rita Pierson. It felt like a great pep talk as many of us enter another crazy week of practicum. Check it out!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFnMTHhKdkw

There are five important lessons in it that stood out to me:

“Kids don’t learn from people they don’t like”

I reflected on my favorite elementary school teachers and realized it really was the relationships I built with them that made me remember them the most. I remember the way I felt in their classrooms. Like Rita Pierson mentioned, I consequently remember specific things that they taught me. In 3rd grade, Ms. Kelly taught us about simple machines, prairie life and division. In one of my textbooks, titled Seven Simple Secrets: What the BEST Teachers Know and Do!, a teacher said,  “I know that when a student feels like he’s special to me, then he’s much more likely to behave, to do his work, and to enjoy learning, then there’s practically nothing I can’t teach him. So if I want all my students to behave, do their work, and enjoy learning, I’ve simply got no choice but to make them all feel like they’re special to me”. Our relationships with our students are so vital, so as you interact with your class this week, keep that in mind!

“You were so excited, we just let you go”

Rita was so excited about teaching the subject material that the kids were merciful when she didn’t even teach it right! Excitement can make the biggest difference! It’s contagious too!

“Plus two, not minus 18”

That student’s thoughts went from “I failed…” to “I am on a roll! I got two right! I’m bound to get more right next time!”. We can help students see the glass half full, rather than half empty.

“Your toughest kids are never absent!”

That’s good! They need the connections and relationships at school that you help them develop.

“Every child deserves a champion, an adult who will never give up on them”

We need to insist that they become the best that they can be. When you get a glimpse of their potential, run with it!

Posted in Miscellaneous

Some of My First Teaching Experiences

I took PETE 212 last semester. We got to teach PE for 4 weeks in an elementary school during the semester. After each class, I recorded my experience. I learned a lot. Enjoy!

BLOG PIC 1

DAY 1 Today it was me and 25 third graders in PE class. I was nervous out of my mind! I am in a Classroom Management class and learning all of the tricks and today was the day to put them to the test! I watched videos of experienced PE teachers. I rehearsed what I would say. I kept a notecard in my pocket in case I forgot what was next. The music app that we were hoping to use didn’t work, but I improvised. I am learning first hand that one of the most important characteristics for a teacher to have is flexibility (and I go to yoga twice a week, but that’s not what I mean!). The third graders were so well behaved! They enjoyed the activity and were sad when they couldn’t play the game longer because their teacher arrived to take them to recess. Overall, it was a great experience. I think I will enjoy it more next time because I know what to expect. I’m excited! I want to learn their names.

BLOG PIC 2.pngDAY 2 Today went really well! We were told to have an introductory activity, do a few fitness routines, teach the kids 3 dances, as well as play a game. That’s a lot! We didn’t get to the second half of the last dance or the game, but that’s okay! I tried to learn a few of their names. One third grader was having a rough day. He probably should have been sent to time-out, but stopping the whole class during dance instruction would have punished the whole class, instead of this specific child. The students caught on quickly as we taught them dances. I taught them a Hungarian dance, as well as the popcorn line dance. It was fun to do the dances to music! I had high expectations for them with the “move  and freeze” technique. If they didn’t comply, we did it again. If they can’t follow directions, then they will miss out on fun activities. That is the discipline plan that we are taught to follow. Students are familiar with it too, so they know when we are not following it. Overall, it was a successful day! Next time I teach, I will be on my own (no partner!)!

BLOG PIC 3.jpg

DAY 3 I didn’t teach today, but my partner did. I came to help and it was a good thing I did! We arrived at the school with all the equipment, the camera, microphone, and music system. The piece that attaches the camera to the camera stand was missing. That meant that someone was going to have to hold the camera and film for an hour and a half. We went with it and I started filming the first class. My other group members ventured into the PE equipment closet and found a volleyball referee stand. We set the camera on it. It worked! The second class that was assigned to BYU PE for the day told us they were only able to come for 15 minutes, so another class joined us. Now there were 45 kids in PE class! My partner did great! The final class was a 6th grade class. They went outside and played soccer. In the middle of the lesson, the microphone stopped working. We had to run around and find some working batteries to get it working again. Wow! Talk about learning to improvise and be flexible! It was a whirlwind of a day, but we survived!

BLOG PIC 4.JPGDAY 4 It was a bittersweet day. At the beginning of class, I reminded my third graders that today was our last day and that I expected their very best behavior. I know that parachute day was certainly my favorite day in gym class as a child, so we brought out the parachute! Before taking the parachute out of the bag, we talked about rules. We recently learned in my Classroom Management class that when students take part in the making of the rules, they are more likely to follow them. Several students raised their hands with great ideas about the way we should handle the parachute and how we should control our bodies. They came up with ideas that I wouldn’t have even thought of! It was great! I wasn’t expecting a few students to lose their shoes during the activity, but we paused and regrouped a few times and it turned out fine! One little girl had a hard time today when split into teams. She wanted to be with a certain boy. I can never guess what will happen because two weeks ago my third graders struggled with cooties! The third graders did a really good job with the jump ropes, which we moved onto after the parachute. Taking turns was sometimes difficult for them, but everyone eventually got a turn to twirl the jump rope and to jump. At the end, we played a quick round of Squirrels in the Tree before class was over.

I was so much more confident this time. I was flexible and made things up as I went. That is major progress, considering that the first two times I didn’t do anything unless it was written on my note card! I am going to miss doing this every week! Sometimes it was painful to see my weaknesses and watch moments I wasn’t totally proud of on my films over and over again, but it was worth it. It was quite the learning experience, considering that I was the teacher! What have you learned from some of your first teaching experiences? I would love to hear!