Posted in Miscellaneous

STONE- AGE THINKING 

by David Squires
Seventeenth-century U.S. author and physician, Oliver Wendell Holmes, provides us with a blueprint as a model for developing our own mansion of thinking.

Holmes suggested, “There are one-story intellects, two-story intellects, and three-story intellects with skylights.

All fact collectors with no aim beyond their facts are one-story men.

Two-story men compare, reason, and generalize, using labors of the fact collectors as well as their own.

Three-story men idealize, imagine, and predict. Their best illuminations come from above through the skylight.” Here is my model which I call Stone-Age Thinking.

Keystone is defined as the central supporting element of the whole. The keystone is that which other associated stone-age features lean upon.

Cornerstone thinking is something that has fundamental importance in thinking. It is often referred to as the foundation and is essential or basic to how you think.

Capstone thinking is the crowning achievement of your thought processing. It is defining success that caps your greatest thinking.

Gemstone thinking is associated with how brilliant your thinking becomes. Inspired thinking shines as a thing of beauty.  It is a stone that is prized because of its beauty or worth.

Grindstone thinking is the thinking within your processing that sharpens and shapes all other elements of your thinking. It requires hard work and perseverance.

Steppingstones are processes that serve as a means of advancing or rising to achieve goals. The path of well-placed steppingstones leads to advancement or improvement.

Milestones mark important events in life’s experiences. Great thinkers mark significant events in the stages of productivity or performance.

Millstones. Unfortunately, thinkers sometimes throw millstones into otherwise productive thinking. Millstones may completely destroy one’s thinking mansion. A millstone becomes a burden and thus an obstacle to successful thinking outcomes.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s