Posted in Miscellaneous

Falling in Love…with Science

Ever wonder how to incorporate Valentine’s day into the curriculum? Valentine’s does not have to just mean candy and class parties. Why not use the treats to teach? Just grab a bag of conversation hearts and give these science experiments a try!

“Ghost Candy”
Need:
– 6 conversation hearts (same color)
Directions:
Put three hearts in a dark place (cabinet or drawer) and the other three hearts in a sunny place (window). In 3-7 days, compare the hearts that were in a dark place with those in a sunny place.
Teaching Points:
– the sun
– how it fades colors

“Jumping Bean Hearts”
Need:
– carbonated soda (Sprite, 7 Up, …)
– 3 conversation hearts
Directions:
Pour some soda into a cup and add the conversation hearts. Watch to see what happens.
Teaching Points:
– carbonation
– it is a gas
– causes hearts to “jump” up and down

“Melting Hearts”
Need:
– 3 glasses of water (one cold, one room temperature, one hot)
– conversation hearts
Directions:
Have the students make predictions about which which temperature of water the candy will dissolve fastest and slowest in. Then add some conversation hearts to each glass of water and watch to see which one dissolves the conversation hearts first.
Teaching Points:
– why conversation hearts dissolve
– why the conversation hearts dissolved quicker in hot water

“Dissolving Magic Hearts”
Need:
– 3 conversation hearts (one whole, one crushed, one powder)
– 3 glasses of warm water
Directions:
Have the students make predictions about whether the whole, crushed, or powder conversation heart will dissolve fastest. Then add one type of conversation heart to each glass and watch to see which one dissolves first.
Teaching Points:
– why conversation hearts dissolve
– why the crushed conversation heart dissolved fastest

“Floating Hearts”
Need:
– big bowl of room temperature water
– conversation hearts
– other items (penny, marble, m&m’s, etc.)
Directions:
Have the students make predictions about which items will sink and which items will float. Then test each item and see if it sinks or floats. Compare results to predictions.
Teaching Points:
– what sinks and floats
– why things sink or float

What other ways can you explore science using conversation hearts?

Ideas Adapted From:
http://momentswithmandi.com/5-conversation-hearts-science-experiments-for-kids/

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